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ASR Medallion

ASR Medallion

The ASR's highest honour is the ASR Medallion.  Criteria are defined in an annexe to the ASR's Constitution.

ASR Medallion

 

Recipients

 

Heritage of the ASR Medallion

The ASR Medallion was created by renowned sculptor Michael Meszaros following consultation with the ASR. 

Mr. Meszaros described his ideas which lead to the final design: 

Rheology is concerned with both the characteristics of fluids and the human control of these characteristics. Knowledge of these factors allows rheologists to utilise both to achieve a designed result.

The medal shows an elastic fluid emerging from a pipe, controlled by a valve. The fluid falls into a cupped pair of hands, which guide the overflow to spill over the edge of the medallion.

Thus there is a depiction of the mechanical control of a fluid, the human control of the fluid and an expression of the characteristics of the fluid itself.

 

Sculptor Michael Meszaros
Sculptor Michael Meszaros, who designed the ASR Medallion in consultation with the ASR.

 

Roger Tanner

Roger Tanner is a pioneer in the field of rheology with more than half a century of experience. Although he is best known for his Engineering Rheology book, his scholarly contributions to experimental and computational rheology is are broad and include another 3 books, 11 book chapters, 270 refereed Journal journal papers and 88 conference manuscripts.

Roger is an elected member of several Academies including the Australian Academy for Technological Sciences and Engineering (FTSE, 1977); ), the Australian Academy of Science (FAA, 1979); ), and the Royal Society of London (FRS, 2001), as well as being an Honorary Fellow of Engineers Australia and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He has been awarded several medals including the Medallion from the Australian Society of Rheology (1993); ), and the Gold Medal from the British Society of Rheology (2000).

Nhan Phan-Thien with Roger Tanner circa 1997
Dr. Nhan Phan-Thien and Dr. Roger Tanner, circa 1997, with the microfourier rheometer that they helped to develop.

David Boger

David Boger has had an illustrious career spanning five decades. Some of his major works include the discovery of Boger fluids, and the demonstration of how basic surface chemistry can strongly determine yield stress and other properties of particulate fluids. Equally remarkable is his commitment to applying the insights from basic research to solve hard industrial problems, consulting extensively with the petroleum, food and minerals industries. He has also extensively worked towards achieving an environmentally sustainable minerals industry, resulting in a considerable shift in the industry’s approach to waste management.

He has been awarded several medals including the British Society of Rheology Gold Medal, the Walter Ahlstom Environmental Prize by the Finnish Academies of Technology, the Medallion of the Australian Society of Rheology, the Flinders Medal of the Australian Academy of Science, the Chemeca Medal of the Institution of Chemical Engineers, and the Clunies Ross National Science and Technology Award. He has also been awarded the Prime Minister’s Prize for Science, the Centenary Medal, and the Victoria Prize. He was elected a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science, the Australian Academy of Technological Science and Engineering, and the Royal Society.

Nhan Phan-Thien

Prof. Nhan Phan-Thien today
ASR Medallion recipient Prof. Nhan Phan-Thien circa 2004, now based at the National University of Singapore.
Nhan Phan-Thien's Ph.D. graduation, with Roger Tanner
Nhan Phan-Thien graduating from his PhD in Mechanical Engineering at Sydney University circa 1979, with Roger Tanner.

Sati N. Bhattacharya

 

David Boger, Sati Bhattacharya and Roger Tanner at 2013 AGM

ASR Medallion recipients Prof. David Boger, Prof. Sati Bhattacharya, and Prof. Roger Tanner, at the 30th anniversary AGM in July 2013.

Tamarapu Sridhar

 
ASR Medallion recipient Prof. Tamarapu Sridhar (left) receiving the award from Dr. Mark Coghill (right) at the AGM in July 2014.

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